FAQs

We are pleased to provide answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on a wide variety common questions. If your questions are not answered on these pages, or if you simply wish to speak with a Service Representative, please contact us from anywhere in North America at (281) 407-1002.

Q. How much does one “square” cover?
A. One square will cover 100 sq. ft. of area when installed at the manufacturer’s maximum recommend exposure.

Q. What does the term “exposure” mean?
A. The term “exposure” refers to the height of each row or the viewable portion of the shake or shingle once it’s installed.

Q. Can I use a different exposure than the manufacturer’s recommended maximum?
A. Exceeding the manufacturer’s recommended maximum exposure may invalidate any available warranty. You may use an exposure that is less, but remember to recalculate your coverage or you will end up short on material. (Please see our coverage tables.)

Q. How can a homeowner recognize when a roof has problems?
A. All too often, roof problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Yearly inspections can often uncover cracked, warped, or missing shingles, loose seams and deteriorated flashings, excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or down-spouts, and other visible signs of roof problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard, and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas.

Q. What are my options if I decide to re-roof?
A. You have two basic options. You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving a tear-off of the old roof, or a re-cover over the existing roof, involving only the installation of a new membrane and surfacing. If you’ve already had one recover over your original roof, check with a professional roofing contractor to see if your deck can support a second layer.

Q. My roof leaks. Do I need to have it totally replaced?
A. Not necessarily. Leaking can result because some flashings have come loose or because a section of the roof has been damaged. A roof failure, however, is generally irreversible and results from improper installation or choice of materials, or from the installation of a roof system inappropriate to the building.

Q. How long can I expect my roof to last?
A. The condition and lifespan of your roof will depend on the type of roof you have, the effects of your local environment and the maintenance which the roof has received. According to the American Society of Home Inspectors, asphalt shingles generally last 15-20 years; wood shingle/shakes, 10-40 years; clay/concrete tiles, 20+ years; slate, 30-100 years; metal roofing, 15-40+years. Roofing product manufacturers off a variety of warranties on their products. Take a close look at those warranties to see what responsibilities and financial obligations they will assume if their products fail to reach their expected lifetimes.

Q. What will a new roof cost?
A. The price of a new roof varies widely, depending on the material selected, the contractor doing the work, the home itself, area of the country, local labor rates, time of year, and more. To get a good idea of the cost for your roof, get three of four estimates from reputable contractors in your area. Keep in mind that cost is only one factor, and it must be balanced against the quality of the materials and workmanship. For each roofing material there are different grades – and corresponding prices. Plus, there are a variety of styles and shapes. You need to look at the full product range and make a choice based on your budget and needs. Within the roofing profession there are different levels of expertise and craftsmanship. Pick a contractor who is committed to quality work.

Q. When will I know that it is time to replace my roof?
A. Before replacing your roof, check for structural integrity. Look for leaks, loose boards and rotten wood in your yard and attic. If your roof is over 15 years old or shows any of the following signs, you might want to consider replacing it: algae growth, blistering, buckling, ceiling spots, curling, damaged flashing, missing granules or shingles, rotting.

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